Byron G. Rogers Federal Building and United States Courthouse

Denver, United States

Byron G. Rogers Federal Building and United States Courthouse

The Byron G. Rogers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse is a historic building on Stout Street in downtown Denver, Colorado, which serves as a courthouse of the United States District Court for the District of Colorado. Completed in 1965, the building was renamed for Colorado Congressman Byron G. Rogers in 1984. In 1996 and 1997, the criminal case against bomber Timothy McVeigh was conducted there. Additionally, the federal building is home to 11 federal agencies, including the United States Patent and Trademark Office's new Rocky Mountain Regional location that opened on June 30, 2014. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2016.

In the years following World War II, the population of Denver, Colorado, grew rapidly as numerous federal agencies located to the city. The existing federal building could no longer accommodate growing space needs, and the government began planning for a new complex to house the United States District Court and the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. In 1959, the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) selected the accomplished Denver architectural firm James Sudler Associates as the lead designer, with another skilled Denver firm, Fisher & Davis, assisting. James Sudler designed numerous Modern buildings in the Denver area, including the exuberant Church of the Risen Christ and the Denver Art Museum (with Gio Ponti).



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