Gloriette

Vienna, Austria

Gloriette

9.2

A gloriette (from the 12th-century French gloire meaning "little room") is a building in a garden erected on a site that is elevated with respect to the surroundings. The structural execution and shape can vary greatly, often in the form of a pavilion or tempietto, more or less open on the sides.

The largest and probably best-known gloriette is in the Schönbrunn Palace garden in Vienna. Built in 1775 as the last building constructed in the garden according to the plans of Austrian imperial architect Johann Ferdinand Hetzendorf von Hohenberg as a "temple of renown" to serve as both a focal point and a lookout point for the garden, it was used as a dining hall and festival hall as well as a breakfast room for emperor Franz Joseph I. The dining hall, which was used up until the end of the monarchy, today has a café in it, and on the roof an observation platform overlooks Vienna. The gloriette's decorative sculptures were made by the famous Salzburg sculptor Johann Baptist von Hagenauer. The gloriette was destroyed in the Second World War, but had already been restored by 1947, and was restored again in 1995, when its central part was closed with glass panes and converted to a café.

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